PROTECT THE
UNDERGROUND

LOGGING

We lose 64 million acres of forest every year. That’s an area the size of the UK. When forests are logged, the networks living below them are also destroyed.

TILLAGE

Our crops depend on mycorrhizal networks. But modern agriculture uses aggressive tillage and pesticides. These devastate underground networks. Learn more about farming for healthy networks.

FIRE

Fires destroy networks below ground as well as the plants above it. Global heating means these are happening more frequently, even in places like Siberia (one of the coldest on Earth) and the Amazon (one of the wettest).

THE UNDERGROUND
IS A CLIMATE
SOLUTION

UNDERGROUND NETWORKS
MOVE & STORE
EARTH’S CARBON

SEQUESTER

Mycorrhizal fungi sequester carbon in both their living and dead biomass. Mycorrhizal fungi act as a negative feedback to stop rising CO2 levels. It is estimated that each year, 5 billion tons of carbon are transferred from plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

CONSERVE

Mycorrhizal fungi make carbon harder to break down. Arbuscular mycorrhiza are the sole producers of glomalin, an important protein that is very difficult to breakdown – the more the fungi are making the compound, the more carbon gets stored in a form that is difficult to release. In some undisturbed soils, glomalin can account for 30-60% of all carbon.

PROTECT

Arbuscular mycorrhizae are key drivers of soil aggregation – that is what keeps soil particles together. When soil particles aggregate – forming crumbs – this physically protects the carbon from being eaten by other soil microbes. More aggregates means more soil carbon storage.

WE KNOW MORE ABOUT MARS THAN THE UNDERGROUND

The world below our feet is a mystery. A teaspoon of soil can contain millions of individual fungi and several thousand species of microbes. We’ve identified just 1% of the microbes that live there.